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Hoping any Democratic Presidential candidate can develop, let alone enact, a plan to fix our broken health care system is a tad optimistic. Sort of like hoping to win the lottery. But, who wants to live a world with no hope? With an open mind, let’s recap the healthcare topic from the recent #DemDebate.

On October 15, twelve democratic presidential candidates gathered in Westerville, Ohio for the fourth Democratic National Committee primary debate. Many candidates were aggressive in making points, and a few stood out while expressing plans for healthcare. Here’s a quick recap:

Pete Buttigieg takes a stand on Healthcare

Mayor Pete Buttigieg went head to head with opposing candidate Senator Elizabeth Warren and Bernie Sanders, about their plans to introduce healthcare for all. Warren and Sanders believe in a Medicare system that would be provided by the government, and directly create healthcare for all, opposed to private insurance companies. In contrast, Buttigieg believes his plan gives trust back to the American people by letting them make their own healthcare decisions for themselves and their families.

Buttigieg plans to put the people back in charge of their own health and give American citizens freedom to make the best healthcare decisions for their families. The point against Warren and Sanders “Medicare for All” plan, is to keep the government from adding cost and legislation to healthcare and keep the trust within the people.

After being asked multiple questions on if Warren will raise taxes on the middle class to pay for her “Medicare for All” plan, Warren avoided giving a yes or no statement, and delivered a vague answer to the audience. Buttigieg quickly pointed out that Warren was not being honest with the American people about her true plan of universal healthcare.

Senator Amy Klobuchar expressed that Warrens “Medicare for All” is merely creating unattainable hope for those needing healthcare. Klobuchar explained, this universal healthcare plan, simply cannot be done, therefore it is wrong to promise false benefits.

Former Vice President Joe Biden accused Warren and Sanders of trying to con the American people. Sanders responded via Twitter explaining that health coverage is a guaranteed human right. However, Sanders fails to see that he is taking away the human right of freedom, by not letting the American people make their own decisions when it come to their family’s health.

The Main Issue

What’s clear is that all these Democratic candidates, and all of America for that matter, agree that our current healthcare system is broken. Obamacare went a long way toward expanding healthcare for specific populations that were being neglected, basically adding to Medicaid’s coverage. But in doing so, our last attempt to change healthcare ended up increasing costs for small businesses and employers; as well as middle- and upper-class Americans.

Our next legislative health care changes cannot include more increased costs. Healthcare is already America’s largest industry by far, employing one sixth of the country’s workforce. Do we really want that to go up?

Ensuring we all have access to affordable healthcare is why USHealthshare.com was founded. These Presidential candidates might mean well, but a “fix” for one portion of America often ends up burdening another population segment. What will meet one person’s needs, will not always meet another’s. That’s why plans like “Medicare for All” seem destined to fail, because one size does NOT fit all.

So is Buttigieg right to trust Americans—not the government—fix this issue? Are we all capable of making our own decisions about our health? Tell us what you think.